Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?



  • @IRJ said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    As far as Wasabi, I think it has proved to me not to be an enterprise solution over the outages. The pricing is so low in comparison to AWS and Azure, that it isn't much of a surprise they cut corners.

    Have you used them?



  • @VoIP_n00b said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @IRJ said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    As far as Wasabi, I think it has proved to me not to be an enterprise solution over the outages. The pricing is so low in comparison to AWS and Azure, that it isn't much of a surprise they cut corners.
    

    Have you used them?

    Nope and I wont. I was definitely interested until they had all the outages.

    I guess you gotta ask yourself how much do you value your data vs cutting costs?



  • Different regions are there for a reason and it's not just geo-redundancy.
    Fewer hops to your customers means faster service.

    So putting you VMs in another region is not the same as having them where you want them to be.

    I bet productions systems are affected. Just think about it. If Microsoft put the brakes on it has to be because they can't allow any more overprovisioning of resources because then performance has degraded way too much. So of course performance is already degraded, right up to the level that Microsoft has determined that it will not cause they majority of their customers to abandon ship.

    They have of course a number for that. If you run a benchmark on a cloud VM you'll never get the performance that the VM has when it runs alone on a hypervisor with the exact same CPU. My guess is that at least 50% degradation is acceptable.



  • This post is deleted!


  • @Pete-S said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    Different regions are there for a reason and it's not just geo-redundancy.
    Fewer hops to your customers means faster service.

    So putting you VMs in another region is not the same as having them where you want them to be.

    I bet productions systems are affected. Just think about it. If Microsoft put the brakes on it has to be because they can't allow any more overprovisioning of resources because then performance has degraded way too much. So of course performance is already degraded, right up to the level that Microsoft has determined that it will not cause they majority of their customers to abandon ship.

    Thats why the have US-East 1 and US-East 2 which are both actually different regions, but are geographically similar.

    Also no reports of systems being affected so it seems like they are provisioning properly. There alerts and thresholds that can prevent performance issues, and like the article mentioned none of have been reported. So how can you just assume otherwise?



  • @Pete-S said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    Different regions are there for a reason and it's not just geo-redundancy.
    Fewer hops to your customers means faster service.

    So putting you VMs in another region is not the same as having them where you want them to be.

    So you can also use Azure CDN to resolve this even if you have instance in West, you can use their CDN to make it faster for use in East customers.



  • @IRJ said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    So how can you just assume otherwise?

    I wrote some more in my post but basically because the service is always degraded. You have to have a definition of acceptable performance loss to say if there is a performance issue or not. If Microsoft says there are no performance issues it just means that it's according to what they accept.

    What may be acceptable to one customer may not be to another. AFAIK you don't have any performance guarantee whatsoever so how would you know? It has to be so slow that you get timeouts or that the clients will really notice.



  • @Pete-S said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @IRJ said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    So how can you just assume otherwise?

    What may be acceptable to one customer may not be to another. AFAIK you don't have any performance guarantee whatsoever so how would you know? It has to be so slow that you get timeouts or that the clients will really notice.

    Yeah no 100% guarantee, but reserved instances do get higher priority than spot or on demand instances. It doesnt seem to be an issue in AWS, but Azure has had more issues with scaling as they have experienced quite a bit growth.



  • @IRJ said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @Pete-S said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    Different regions are there for a reason and it's not just geo-redundancy.
    Fewer hops to your customers means faster service.

    So putting you VMs in another region is not the same as having them where you want them to be.

    So you can also use Azure CDN to resolve this even if you have instance in West, you can use their CDN to make it faster for use in East customers.

    True, but that is only for static web content. Who knows what people are using their cloud instances for. Every workload is not a server running wordpress 🙂



  • @Pete-S said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @IRJ said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @Pete-S said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    Different regions are there for a reason and it's not just geo-redundancy.
    Fewer hops to your customers means faster service.

    So putting you VMs in another region is not the same as having them where you want them to be.

    So you can also use Azure CDN to resolve this even if you have instance in West, you can use their CDN to make it faster for use in East customers.

    True, but that is only for static web content. Who knows what people are using their cloud instances for. Every workload is not a server running wordpress 🙂

    Thats for alot more than wordpress. Nearly every web app has static content.



  • @IRJ said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @Pete-S said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @IRJ said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @Pete-S said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    Different regions are there for a reason and it's not just geo-redundancy.
    Fewer hops to your customers means faster service.

    So putting you VMs in another region is not the same as having them where you want them to be.

    So you can also use Azure CDN to resolve this even if you have instance in West, you can use their CDN to make it faster for use in East customers.

    True, but that is only for static web content. Who knows what people are using their cloud instances for. Every workload is not a server running wordpress 🙂

    Thats for alot more than wordpress. Nearly every web app has static content.

    Yes, but there are a hundred millions things that are not web apps and has nothing to do with the web at all.



  • @Pete-S said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @IRJ said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @Pete-S said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @IRJ said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @Pete-S said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    Different regions are there for a reason and it's not just geo-redundancy.
    Fewer hops to your customers means faster service.

    So putting you VMs in another region is not the same as having them where you want them to be.

    So you can also use Azure CDN to resolve this even if you have instance in West, you can use their CDN to make it faster for use in East customers.

    True, but that is only for static web content. Who knows what people are using their cloud instances for. Every workload is not a server running wordpress 🙂

    Thats for alot more than wordpress. Nearly every web app has static content.

    Yes, but there are a hundred millions things that are not web apps and has nothing to do with the web at all.

    Yes, but it does way more than web apps. Mobile apps, streaming services, API, etc. Pretty much anyone interacting with data can use it. I agree it isnt a one size fits all, but it does handle ALOT of services.



  • @Obsolesce said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    Yeah the growth is crazy. They should have planned better, but I suppose you can only plan for so much growth.

    We've been seeing issues with Tier 1/2 storage vendors not being able to meet demand so the problem is not entirely their fault either. There seems to be a high demand for high density 102 bay JBODs right now. :S

    Intel is still having yield issues so expect their ETAs to remain relatively high. The Intel Xeon 6240Y series server we just shipped into the US had to wait for the CPUs with everything else arriving easily a week before. Intel SSDs are also tough to get at this point.



  • @VoIP_n00b said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @IRJ said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    As far as Wasabi, I think it has proved to me not to be an enterprise solution over the outages. The pricing is so low in comparison to AWS and Azure, that it isn't much of a surprise they cut corners.
    

    Have you used them?

    I used them. They were great for several months. I redirected my off-site backups from AWS S3 to Wasabi. During September and October, I could not get any files into (or out of) my buckets, so I was forced to switch back to AWS S3.



  • @wrx7m said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @VoIP_n00b said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @IRJ said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    As far as Wasabi, I think it has proved to me not to be an enterprise solution over the outages. The pricing is so low in comparison to AWS and Azure, that it isn't much of a surprise they cut corners.
    

    Have you used them?

    I used them. They were great for several months. I redirected my off-site backups from AWS S3 to Wasabi. During September and October, I could not get any files into (or out of) my buckets, so I was forced to switch back to AWS S3.

    I'm using Wasabi East-1 and I've not had any problems with my backups not working-- or retrieving files.



  • @dafyre said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @wrx7m said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @VoIP_n00b said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @IRJ said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    As far as Wasabi, I think it has proved to me not to be an enterprise solution over the outages. The pricing is so low in comparison to AWS and Azure, that it isn't much of a surprise they cut corners.
    

    Have you used them?

    I used them. They were great for several months. I redirected my off-site backups from AWS S3 to Wasabi. During September and October, I could not get any files into (or out of) my buckets, so I was forced to switch back to AWS S3.

    I'm using Wasabi East-1 and I've not had any problems with my backups not working-- or retrieving files.

    Yeah, same here. No problem at all.



  • @dbeato said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @dafyre said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @wrx7m said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @VoIP_n00b said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    @IRJ said in Want some Wasabi with that Azure Cloud?:

    As far as Wasabi, I think it has proved to me not to be an enterprise solution over the outages. The pricing is so low in comparison to AWS and Azure, that it isn't much of a surprise they cut corners.
    

    Have you used them?

    I used them. They were great for several months. I redirected my off-site backups from AWS S3 to Wasabi. During September and October, I could not get any files into (or out of) my buckets, so I was forced to switch back to AWS S3.

    I'm using Wasabi East-1 and I've not had any problems with my backups not working-- or retrieving files.

    Yeah, same here. No problem at all.

    I had some issues getting to the console a bit back. But my backups continued without an issues.



  • East DC was less affected by this. The West DC had way more issues.


Log in to reply