Miscellaneous Tech News



  • Facebook Testing Feature That Would Hide 'Like' Counts

    The total likes and reactions a post receives will reportedly only be accessible to the post's creator. Followers will see if their Facebook friends liked or reacted to the post.
    Facebook might soon hide "like" counts in a bid to protect your mental health. Facebook has been prototyping the feature in its Android app, according to Jane Manchun Wong, an independent developer and privacy researcher. She spotted the code for the test feature while reverse-engineering the app. The total likes and reactions a post receives will only be accessible to the post's creator, according to Wong. Followers will see if their Facebook friends liked or reacted to the post, but will not see the total count. At the most, Facebook will only give viewers of the post a full list of which users liked/reacted to a post. So to find out the total count, viewers will have manually count up all the likes/reactions and then do the math. Facebook-owned Instagram has also been testing hiding like counts from public view. "It's because we want people to worry a little bit less about how many likes they're getting on Instagram and spend a bit more time connecting with the people they care about," Instagram chief Adam Mosseri said in April.



  • Kobo debuts Libra H2O e-reader, updates software with more tools for readers

    Kobo adds new UI tools for those who love taking notes and bookmarking as they read.
    Nearly one year after releasing the Forma e-reader, Kobo returns today with a new slab dubbed the Kobo Libra H2O. The $169 e-reader retains the skeleton of the Forma, but is actually a smaller device. It has a 7-inch, 1680×1264, 300ppi E Ink display, down from the Forma's 8-inch display, but it has the same side-chin with page-turn buttons. Notably, Kobo moved the power button from the edge of the e-reader to the back of the device, and it's now a slightly indented circle that's easy to discern from the device's slightly textured back.



  • How to build Fedora container images

    With the rise of containers and container technology, all major Linux distributions nowadays provide a container base image. This article presents how the Fedora project builds its base image. It also shows you how to use it to create a layered image.
    Before we look at how the Fedora container base image is built, let’s define a base image and a layered image. A simple way to define a base image is an image that has no parent layer. But what does that concretely mean? It means a base image usually contains only the root file system (rootfs) of an operating system. The base image generally provides the tools needed to install software in order to create layered images.





  • Twitter Suspends 'Tweet via SMS' Feature After Account Hijacks

    'We're taking this step because of vulnerabilities that need to be addressed by mobile carriers and our reliance on having a linked phone number for two-factor authentication,' Twitter says.
    Twitter is temporarily shutting off the "Tweet via SMS" message feature after hackers likely abused it to hijack CEO Jack Dorsey's account. Last Friday, hackers briefly took over the @jack account by tricking Dorsey's cellular carrier into handing over his mobile phone number. So far, Twitter hasn't provided all the details about the break-in. However, getting Dorsey's phone number wouldn't be enough to hijack his account. It'd also require inputting the correct password. But the hackers appear to have found a way around this obstacle by exploiting the Tweet via SMS feature. To tweet via SMS, all you have to do is register your mobile phone number with your Twitter account. Then from your smartphone, you can send an SMS message to a special "short code" number (in the US, it's 40404). In response, Twitter will match the SMS message to your account, and automatically post it as a tweet.



  • @mlnews good to see someone big recognizing the massive insecurity that is SMS.



  • Android 10 Review

    Clear your schedule: this is our longest Android review ever.
    It is once again time for Google's big yearly Android rollout. This year we're up to "Android 10," though if we're counting by API levels (which actually go up one per release) this is the 29th release of Android. For most of 2019, this new software snack has been in beta under the name "Android Q," and we've seen a whopping six beta releases. Normally that "Q" would turn into a snack-themed codename with the final release, but this year the "Q" apparently stands for "Quitters"—the codename branding is dead. Android is going on a textual diet and it's just "Android 10," with no snacks attached.



  • Google's 'secret web tracking pages' explained

    Google has been accused of using hidden webpages that are assigned to users to provide more information to advertisers about their every move online.
    The allegation has been added to a complaint lodged with the Irish Data Protection Commission. The tech firm insists it acts in accordance with EU privacy laws. It comes a day after Google was fined $170m (£138m) by a US watchdog for illegally capturing data from children and targeting them with adverts. Privacy-focused web browser Brave has published details of an investigation it conducted into a Google ad system known as Authorised Buyers, which was previously known as DoubleClick. It sent the findings to the Irish data commissioner as a supplementary part of a complaint filed last year. Chief policy officer Johnny Ryan used Google's Chrome browser to conduct his research. He had no logins, cookies or browsing history on the device so was, in effect, a new user.





  • Qualcomm Promises More 5G Phones, Better Range

    A new Qualcomm antenna system promises six times the range we've seen from Verizon's millimeter-wave 5G system so far, but only for home internet setups.
    Qualcomm powers all the 5G devices in the US right now, but this first round has been disappointing; the current crop of 5G phones are expensive, have poor coverage, and overheat easily. Today at IFA, Qualcomm told us to cheer up: there's more and better 5G coming. A lot of the announcement was hazy, because Qualcomm is teasing out the details through the end of the year. The chipmaker has a big 5G event in late September, followed by its annual conference in December, at which we expect to see the game changer—the Snapdragon 865 chipset with integrated 5G. But for now, the tease. Qualcomm emphasized that we'll see phones with 700-series integrated 5G chipsets in early 2020 and 600-series ones in late 2020. The 700 series chips are popular in China, so that's a signal about lots of Chinese 5G phones coming. Interestingly, Qualcomm said 700-series 5G devices will come out in North America as well, and called out Motorola and LG as potential providers. The 600 series is Qualcomm's reasonably priced midrange, so that's a signal about 5G device prices coming down next year.



  • Firefox is stepping up its blocking game

    Mozilla is serious about privacy—and it wants you to be, too.
    Mozilla turned the blocking of third-party tracking cookies on by default this week with the release of Firefox 69. Although the feature has been available since October's Firefox 63, this week's build is the first to enable the feature by default, even for existing users who are just upgrading. Mozilla says that it's not trying to block actual ads, only trackers. For the most part, it has succeeded; in our testing, we frequently saw 30 or more tracking elements blocked on sites whose ads still display. The balance Mozilla is aiming for here is an increase in privacy for users, along with faster page load times—but without harming small websites and content creators who rely on revenue generated by ads from the same third-party networks whose trackers are being blocked.



  • Latest Windows 10 Update Turns Everything Orange

    We don't know what caused the orange tint bug yet, but updating your graphics card drivers may fix it rather than opting to uninstall the cumulative patch.
    Even though Microsoft takes every effort to remove all the bugs before releasing a Windows 10 update, some do go undetected. The latest to slip through the net is quite a colorful one. As MSPoweruser reports, the Windows 10 May 2019 Update (1903) Cumulative Update KB4512941 includes a number of major fixes, but it's also adding a tint of orange to everything displayed on screen. Some users are complaining this happens when capturing a screenshot, whereas others state the discoloring gets progressively worse, turning from a light shade of orange and becoming more red as time goes by. The only element on screen that isn't affected is the mouse pointer.



  • @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Latest Windows 10 Update Turns Everything Orange

    We don't know what caused the orange tint bug yet, but updating your graphics card drivers may fix it rather than opting to uninstall the cumulative patch.
    Even though Microsoft takes every effort to remove all the bugs before releasing a Windows 10 update, some do go undetected. The latest to slip through the net is quite a colorful one. As MSPoweruser reports, the Windows 10 May 2019 Update (1903) Cumulative Update KB4512941 includes a number of major fixes, but it's also adding a tint of orange to everything displayed on screen. Some users are complaining this happens when capturing a screenshot, whereas others state the discoloring gets progressively worse, turning from a light shade of orange and becoming more red as time goes by. The only element on screen that isn't affected is the mouse pointer.

    🙂

    proxy.duckduckgo.com.jpg



  • Microsoft Teams is confirmed as coming to Linux: https://www.neowin.net/news/microsoft-teams-is-officially-coming-to-linux/



  • Apple reveals iOS 13 and iPadOS release dates—but macOS Catalina remains a mystery

    watchOS and tvOS updates are also just around the corner.
    CUPERTINO, Calif.—Apple's annual major public releases of iOS, iPadOS, and watchOS will arrive by the end of this month, Apple revealed on its website as it unveiled new hardware products in a live-streamed event today. iOS 13 will hit iPhones and watchOS 6 will reach Apple Watches on September 19. iPadOS will ship a few days later on September 30. macOS Catalina is still due at an as-yet unspecified date in October. Since Apple already made its announcement detailing features of the new operating systems at its developer conference back in June, today's event was focused on new hardware like the iPhone. But Apple often launches its major operating system releases alongside new hardware—especially when they involve mobile devices. iOS 13 adds Dark Mode to the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. It can be toggled on and off from within the Control Center. The update also adds a plethora of new photo and video features, including more robust editing capabilities. iOS 13 also adds a more natural-sounding voice for Siri, a number of updated Maps features, and a total overhaul of the oft-criticized Reminders app. But perhaps the most significant change in iOS 13 is the introduction of iPadOS, a new, tablet-specific version of the operating system that offers improved multitasking capabilities and other features for power users—all intended to make the iPad more viable as a laptop replacement.



  • This Is Why the iPhone 11 Doesn't Have 5G

    The iPhone 11 and 11 Pro don't have 5G. Why not? And how do they work as 4G phones? We have the details on MIMO, dual SIMs, voice quality, and 4G bands.
    It's not called the "iCamera," but Apple spent zero time talking about how its brand-new iPhones, the iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro, work as, you know, phones. As other smartphone makers race towards 5G, Apple is holding back. There are both sensible business reasons and Apple-specific reasons for doing so. 5G right now is a mess. The only US-compatible 5G chipset ready for a fall launch is the Qualcomm X50. It's in all of the existing 5G phones, but it doesn't "just work" the way Apple wants its devices to work. It isn't compatible with the US carriers' upcoming multi-band networks, and it appears to make devices overheat in the summer. The antenna modules for the early 5G networks are also finicky at best.*



  • Debian 10: Playing catch-up with the rest of the Linux world (that’s a good thing)

    If you skipped the last release, Debian 10 (Buster) should encourage an update into 2019.
    The Debian project, the upstream mother of countless Linux distributions, has released Debian 10, also known as "Buster." And yes, that's a reference to the character from Toy Story. All Debian releases are named after Toy Story characters. Over the years, Debian has built a well-deserved reputation as a rock-solid distro for those who don't want the latest and greatest and instead prefer the stability that comes from sticking with what works. Naturally, Debian gets security updates, bug fixes, and maintenance releases like any distro, but don't expect major updates to applications or desktop environments with this Linux flavor. Right now, as with every release, Debian is pretty close to up to date with what the rest of the Linux world is doing. But Buster will be supported for five years, and Debian 11 won't arrive for at least two years (Buster comes just 26 months after Debian 9, though it has been five years since the big tweaks of Debian 8). So as time goes on, Buster will look increasingly outdated.







  • Supposedly it will run any Linux, too. Would be great to see some Ubuntu or Fedora reviews on it.



  • SIM Card Flaw Poses Spying Threat, But US Users Appear to Be Safe

    A security firm has disclosed a disturbing vulnerability in SIM cards that can be exploited to track a phone's location. But an industry trade group says most carriers no longer use the affected technology.
    A security firm has disclosed a disturbing vulnerability in SIM cards that can be exploited to track a phone's location, and potentially take over the device. But the hacking danger may be overblown, at least in the US; an industry trade group says most customers are not affected.The reported vulnerability, dubbed "SimJacker," deals with old software tech in SIM cards called the S@T Browser, which was last updated in 2009. On Thursday, security firm AdaptiveMobile published a report, which said you can send a specially crafted SMS message to hijack the S@T Browser on a victim's phone to execute computer code.



  • @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Debian 10: Playing catch-up with the rest of the Linux world (that’s a good thing)

    If you skipped the last release, Debian 10 (Buster) should encourage an update into 2019.
    The Debian project, the upstream mother of countless Linux distributions, has released Debian 10, also known as "Buster." And yes, that's a reference to the character from Toy Story. All Debian releases are named after Toy Story characters. Bla bla bla...

    WTF is news about that? Debian 10 been out since July.

    Next release will be always be in about two years or so. It's released when it's ready and that's how it has been for almost twenty years now.

    If you want to post real news then it's that Debian 10.1 was released a couple of days ago.
    https://www.debian.org/News/2019/20190907
    You can still use old 10.0 iso install media and when you update packages you will get the same as 10.1.

    This is the latest netinstall image Debian 10.1 for amd64:
    https://cdimage.debian.org/debian-cd/current/amd64/iso-cd/debian-10.1.0-amd64-netinst.iso



  • Preventing GPS spoofing is hard—but you can at least detect it

    This GPS spoofing defense software looks promising, but it's short on detail.
    Today at the IAA (International Motor Show) in Frankfurt, Regulus Cyber announced a new software-only GPS spoof detection product. This product, Pyramid GNSS, is what the company was hyping when it executed a Pied Piper attack on a Tesla Model S this June. Regulus Cyber demonstrated the new product, Pyramid GNSS, to us yesterday via Web conference from the IAA. Pyramid GNSS was running on a Linux-powered laptop with GPS receiver and successfully intercepted spoofed GNSS signals coming from another laptop with a software-defined radio a few feet away. An iPhone in the same room picked up the spoofed GPS signals and erroneously showed itself driving down a nearby highway. But the laptop running Pyramid—which had a copy of what appeared to be Google Maps running—remained stationary.



  • @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Preventing GPS spoofing is hard—but you can at least detect it

    This GPS spoofing defense software looks promising, but it's short on detail.
    Today at the IAA (International Motor Show) in Frankfurt, Regulus Cyber announced a new software-only GPS spoof detection product. This product, Pyramid GNSS, is what the company was hyping when it executed a Pied Piper attack on a Tesla Model S this June. Regulus Cyber demonstrated the new product, Pyramid GNSS, to us yesterday via Web conference from the IAA. Pyramid GNSS was running on a Linux-powered laptop with GPS receiver and successfully intercepted spoofed GNSS signals coming from another laptop with a software-defined radio a few feet away. An iPhone in the same room picked up the spoofed GPS signals and erroneously showed itself driving down a nearby highway. But the laptop running Pyramid—which had a copy of what appeared to be Google Maps running—remained stationary.

    So how does this help anyone play Pokemon Go, Wizards Unite or any other such game without having to walk. . .




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