Installing osTicket 1.10 on CentOS 7



  • That will affect it a bit. Seven versions newer.



  • @scottalanmiller

    Yours was the only set of instructions for installing osTicket 1.10 on CentOS 7 I found online that actually worked. Thanks and kudos to you!

    I am not technical but I did manage to cobble the following commands together:

    yum -y install epel-release && yum -y install firewalld mariadb mariadb-server httpd php unzip php-mysql php-imap php-xml php-mbstring php-pecl-apcu php-pecl-zendopcache php-intl php-gd && systemctl start firewalld && systemctl enable firewalld && systemctl start httpd && systemctl enable httpd && firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-port=80/tcp --permanent && firewall-cmd --zone=public --add-port=443/tcp --permanent && firewall-cmd --reload && cd /tmp && wget http://osticket.com/sites/default/files/download/osTicket-v1.10.zip && unzip osTicket-v1.10.zip && cp -rp upload /var/www/html/helpdesk && chown -R apache:apache /var/www/html/helpdesk && cd /var/www/html/helpdesk && cp include/ost-sampleconfig.php include/ost-config.php && chmod 0666 include/ost-config.php && systemctl start mariadb && systemctl enable mariadb && mysql_secure_installation

    and then finish the rest of the installation, more or less, following your steps.

    When I install osTicket-v1.10.zip on a Vultr.com VPS with CentOS 7 with 512 MB of RAM using:

    wget http://osticket.com/sites/default/files/download/osTicket-v1.10.zip && unzip osTicket-v1.10.zip

    in the above set of commands, new tickets do not appear at all in the osTicket admin panel although the users who create the commands do appear as users. In other words, if a user named Fred Jones (who dropped in out of the blue) were to create a new ticket, I would not see his ticket in the admin panel, but I would see Fred Jones in the admin panel.

    However, when I install osTicket-v1.9.12.zip on a Vultr.com VPS with CentOS 7 with 512 MB of RAM using:

    wget http://osticket.com/sites/default/files/download/osTicket-v1.9.12.zip && unzip osTicket-v1.9.12.zip

    in the above set of commands, new tickets do properly appear in the osTicket admin panel.

    In other words, in this second case if a user named Fred Jones (who dropped in out of the blue) were to create a new ticket, I would see his ticket in the admin panel and I would see Fred Jones in the admin panel.

    As I am typing this I am wondering if I were to spin up a VPS with 1024 MB RAM then perhaps that would solve the problem.

    If you would like the URL to login to my osTicket installation please feel free to let me know. There is nothing else on the VPS other than osTicket which I freshly installed and contains a trivial amount of test data.

    I am looking forward to your reply.



  • @nzt Easy enough to test, but seems extremely unlikely that more memory will make a difference to that type of issue.



  • @scottalanmiller Thanks for getting back to me extraordinarily quickly. I actually solved the problem. In neither osTicket v1.9.12 nor osTicket 1.10 did I bother going in to the Admin Panel to set up permissions for the default agent. However, despite that in osTicket v1.9.12 I was able to view the tickets whereas in osTicket 1.10 I needed to actually explicitly set up the permissions.

    My mistake was assuming that osTicket 1.10 would be set up with the same default setting for the default agent as osTicket v1.9.12. I don't have an opinion one way or another about which method is better, but the inconsistency did lead me to make an incorrect assumption.

    Also, I struggled to grasp that osTicket 1.10 was a newer version than osTicket v1.9.12. Eventually I realized it was .10 versus .09 instead of .10 versus .90 However, I would have immediately understood that osTicket 1.10 was newer than osTicket v1.09.12.

    Thanks again for your very helpful tutorial!



  • @nzt you bet! And welcome to the community. Glad that you got everything working for osTicket.



  • @scottalanmiller Thanks for welcoming me warmly.

    I want to configure email on osTicket. Please remember, I am not technical.

    I hope the following does not seem needlessly verbose to you. I have worked with engineers over the years. They typically generally very strongly preferred terse communication to verbose communication.

    According to Configuring email on osTicket, "In order to use Gmail, your host must support SSL, so osTicket can negotiate the secure connection, and you must enable IMAP or POP in your GMail or GApps account."

    I have a Google Apps account, although I think it might be called a Google Suite account now. (I wearied years ago of trying to keep up with Google's executives' seemingly absurdly comical efforts to confuse their customers by capriciously rebranding/renaming/canceling products. Be that as it may, Google makes many excellent products several of which I use nearly every day).

    I have not really used that Google Apps account much in about eight years, but it is grandfathered in as a free account. I logged in the other day and verified that it is still active. Therefore, I would like to use it.

    If I were to follow the directions listed at Issue SSL Certificates for Apache Using Certbot on CentOS 7 does it seem to you that, that SSL certificate would suffice?

    Also, the domain name which is associated with the GoogleApps account is not currently registered with a registrar. The domain name appears to be actually unregistered. After GoDaddy's pernicious practice (years ago) of snagging domains people had looked up but did not register, I prefer not actually look up the domain name for fear some other registrar might snatch it up. I simply went to the URL and saw it was down. Also, the name is not quite obscure but it is close therefore, I would be surprised if anyone had registered it.

    Would I need to re-register my domain in order to test out the osTicket email functionality with with the GoogleApps? I suppose I probably would. See, I do not want to test the osTicket email functionality through some other method than GoogleApps because my experience from around 2005 to 2010 with GoogleApps email service was excellent (nearly flawless if I remember correctly) and because I have a read many horror stories of people who seemed technically competent trying to manager their own email servers.

    I suppose I might test could configure email on osTicket to run through Gmail instead of GoogleApps, but then I would run the risk that email would work properly through Gmail but not through GoogleApps. What is your opinion? Does my concern seem "over the top" the top to you?

    My domain is a .com domain. It looks like for less than $10/year I could register the domain with Namesilo.com (I read many glowign reviews about Namesilo.com on various sub Reddits). But I estimate I won't go live for another 3 to 6 months, and therefore don't want to bother signing up with Namesilo.com and trying to figure out how their site works.

    Sure, it supposed to be easy. But I remember spending many hours wrestling with GoDaddy to get all sorts of things set up (including my email) set up about 8 years ago. Eventually, I set everything up properly. But tasks like this always seem to take me a couple/few hours to figure out. Of course, once I actually get them set up and know how they work, the same stuff that took with a couple/few hours only takes a maybe five to ten minutes the next time I do it.

    I probably spent at least 3 to 4 hours Googling and trying various methods to install osTicket 1.10 on CentOS 7. Now I can install it in about 10 minutes.

    If I were to need re-register my domain to test osTicket's email feature though my Google Apps account then I suppose I would reluctantly sign up for an account with Namesilo.com. Maybe it really will be easy for me to figure out how to use Namesilo.com. Maybe it will only take me, say, five to ten minutes. But I doubt it. By the way, I want to be clear: I am not in any way attempting to besmirch Namesilo.com. I have never actually used their service at all.

    But see. I am not technical. Therefore nuances and nomenclature that technical folks are familiar with are often so foreign and confusing to me that it usually takes me a while to "get up to speed on them." Once I understand the technospeak, I translate it into plain English and put it into some step-by-step notes for myself that I can refer to as needed.

    I am sorry for this verbose message. Thanks for taking the time to read it.



  • I just wanted to say thank you very much for helping me on setting up the osticket.
    I have try with everything winserver 2012,ubuntu and nothing work correctly. until I finally try this with centos 7 and using the lastes osticket version 1.10.1 and it finally work for me with no issue. I would like thank everyone who inputed they smal grain on sand to make this happen.



  • @ghernandez said in Installing osTicket 1.10 on CentOS 7:

    I just wanted to say thank you very much for helping me on setting up the osticket.
    I have try with everything winserver 2012,ubuntu and nothing work correctly. until I finally try this with centos 7 and using the lastes osticket version 1.10.1 and it finally work for me with no issue. I would like thank everyone who inputed they smal grain on sand to make this happen.

    Awesome, glad that it worked. We have many osTicket users here. Myself, @Minion-Queen @pchiodo @gjacobse for example. It's a pretty nice product.



  • As a side note (on this older topic) osTicket 1.11 was released back on Feb 6th. 🙂



  • @ntozier said in Installing osTicket 1.10 on CentOS 7:

    As a side note (on this older topic) osTicket 1.11 was released back on Feb 6th. 🙂

    I guess that it is time for a new guide!



  • @scottalanmiller said in Installing osTicket 1.10 on CentOS 7:

    @ntozier said in Installing osTicket 1.10 on CentOS 7:

    As a side note (on this older topic) osTicket 1.11 was released back on Feb 6th. 🙂

    I guess that it is time for a new guide!

    CentOS or Fedora, especially since PHP 7.2 is supported now and maybe use git to deploy it?



  • @black3dynamite said in Installing osTicket 1.10 on CentOS 7:

    @scottalanmiller said in Installing osTicket 1.10 on CentOS 7:

    @ntozier said in Installing osTicket 1.10 on CentOS 7:

    As a side note (on this older topic) osTicket 1.11 was released back on Feb 6th. 🙂

    I guess that it is time for a new guide!

    CentOS or Fedora, especially since PHP 7.2 is supported now and maybe use git to deploy it?

    Yeah, some big improvements probably.



  • @scottalanmiller it took a while but I got it installed on F29. I just need to figure out the plugin issue not showing up.



  • @mattbagan said in Installing osTicket 1.10 on CentOS 7:

    @scottalanmiller it took a while but I got it installed on F29. I just need to figure out the plugin issue not showing up.

    SELinux can be the reason your plugin is not working.



  • @black3dynamite Good call. I had to make some adjustments to SELinux.